Does homeowners insurance cover water damage due to leak?

Submitted by Insurance Maze on Mon, 11/05/2007 - 13:31
Water leakage is a problem and one that is not covered under homeowners insurance. So, the best thing one can do is to be cautious and keep a regular check. Homeowners insurance would typically refuse any claim related to water leakage over a period of time. It would be categorized under negligence. However, under certain special circumstances, your insurer may provide coverage against damage from a water leak.

Does homeowners insurance cover water damage?

Yes, it does but very specific types. Homeowners insurance would not cover damages from flood. Flood insurance is a separate policy that you need to purchase. It would also not cover damage caused by a leaking pipe in your home, but would cover damage from rain getting inside the house through a hole in the roof or a broken window if the hole or the broken window was a result of a storm or extreme weather conditions. If the water damage was due to your negligence, home insurance would not cover it. If you do not know what kind of water damage is covered by your insurance company, go through your policy papers for details.

If there are damages from a storm in your house make sure you dry all the wet areas after the storm has passed away. Provide air circulation to the wet areas cover them with tar if possible to prevent further damage. This will help minimize the possibility of mould growing in your home.

What duty do you have as a homeowner?

It is your duty to keep a check on all fixtures in your home. See to it that they are all maintained well. If there has been any water damage make sure you remedy it as soon as possible. Even a small leakage can lead to mould that would further damage your property. It also causes health hazards like asthma, sinusitis and bronchitis.

Mould damage may be covered but only if it was caused by a leak that grew due to a storm. If your house has built up mould, make sure you get it cleaned professionally. Amateurs may cause it to spread the spores more.

Insurance companies investigate before they can give the policyholders their money for the loss. Adjusters inspect the areas where the damage occurred and they do find out if the leakage had been for over a period of time or if it had been a sudden outburst. So, it is no use lying to the insurance company. Being honest is the only option open to you.

I have a rather unusual situation with a client and a well-known preferred home insurance carrier. What do you think?

One day the insured came home and for whatever reason he leaned against the bathroom wall and it suddenly collapsed.

The sheetrock was soaked and so was the insulation inside the wall and mold and mildew was everywhere. There was a small pin-hole leak in a water pipe that obviously had been leaking for quite some time.

The insured called the insurance company to report the incident, a claim was filed and an adjustor came to look at the damage.

The claim was denied by the insurance company because the standard HO-3 homeowners' policy specifically "Excludes" a loss as the result of a water leak over an extended period of time.

If this had been a sudden erruption of a water line, a leaking dishwasher, or a leaking fill line to the ice-maker, it would have been covered. Because this leak had been "over an extended period of time" it was not covered.

So, are we to lean against all of our walls everyday just to see if we might have a water leak?

Posted: 06 Nov 2007 04:47 Post Subject: water seepage insurance

Alright... I'm suppose to handle property losses now but I have to admit... I'm not a "property adjuster". :)

I'm looking over an ISO HO-3 and I found the exclusion for "Constant or repeated seepage or leakage of water..." but it goes on to say "...unless such seepage or leakage of water or the presence of condensation... is hidden within walls or ceiling or beneath the floors of above the ceilings of structure". If your carrier removes that exception from the ISO form, I'd write with another carrier. Perhaps the adjuster does not know that this exception might exist in their policy. I'd better shop for something like a water leak insurance.

Posted: 06 Nov 2007 09:08 Post Subject: Ho3 excludes leaking pipes....

The typical HO3 policy doesn't cover water damages caused by leakage of pipes. Water seepage is considered to be a maintenance issue and the homeowner is responsible for monitoring and fixing any leakage (if detected). Therefore, the adjuster is right in that way. If his policy excludes any damages caused by the leaking pipes then he may not receive any compensation for that.

Posted: 06 Nov 2007 10:02 Post Subject: water leak insurance

Hi insurancemaze,

So, are we to lean against all of our walls everyday just to see if we might have a water leak?

.

Well, it seems so. :lol:

These policy verbiages are often tricky. Therefore, it always becomes necessary to acquaint yourself thoroughly with the policy document.

Tcope, very useful information. Thanks buddy, it has cleared some clouds of doubts from my mind also.

Posted: 06 Nov 2007 12:06 Post Subject: water seepage insurance

I handled HO (along with other types) claims for ten years, and they are tricky, ''give the peril here, take it away there''....OP check your policy to see if it ''gives'' the peril back per tcopes post....Which makes sense, if you cannot see (or hear) it, how do you know it happened? when I was handling these losses (87-97), these types of claims were ALWAYS denied, they did not meet the criteral of 'sudden and accidental' and did meet the (denying) critera of , ''slow deterioration". I would caution the homeowner though, even back then when I was handling these, folks would read the policy and say, 'it DID happen suddenly) but then of course upon inspection would clearly see that the faucet had been leaking for years (rust) or mold around the edge of the tub, in this case, maybe could've noticed the wall was saggy or wet? I don't know I'm just saying that is something to think about....

But many things change in ten years! (MAN I'M GETTING OLD! :roll: ) Check the policy wording.

Posted: 06 Nov 2007 04:04 Post Subject: Homeowner's Insurance

Here is the exact HO-3 wording:

"We Do Not Cover:
Continuous or repeated seepage or leakage of water or steam over a period of time, weeks, months or years, from within a plumbing, drainage, heating, air conditioner system or automatic fire protective sprinkler system or from within a household appliance."

I guess the key words here are either "suddenly" or "over a period of time". If the water line had just suddenly bursted and blew out the wall, there would have been no problem.

Most people who buy homeowner's insurance and intentionally request an "all perils" policy would think that a water leak inside a wall would be covered, but they had better read their policy.

Posted: 06 Nov 2007 06:12 Post Subject: water leak insurance

<now that I've had some sleep>

... and it may be the case that the policy I quoted had the 2nd part added to the standard ISO form. Our policies are said be more expensive then most and it's probablyt because the cover a _little_ more then others. Though, I'm not saying this is a good thing. Many people would rather pay a lot less for a _little_ less coverage. In this case it migth have paid for itself but this is probably not typical.

I thought someone mentioned damage caused by the homeowner being covered but don't see that now (sorry if I missed it)... but from 15 years ago taking loss reports I rememeber people having leaks in their slabs. From what I remember the cost to _repair_ the pipe was not covered (maintance) but the _resulting damage_ was (sudden and accidental). Maybe not related but going over to an auto... if an alternator fails and catches on fire, the alternator is not covered (mechanical) but the resulting fire damage is covered. Is this perhaps not at least the same premiss? I'd think the HO-3 policy would not cover the pipe damage but would cover the resulting water damage. I'd think the "sudden" clause would have been met for the damage surrounding the pipe because as soon as the pipe started to leak, the water damage was done. Did the _water_ damage really get worse over time? I doubt it. Keep in mind I'm not talking about any mold damage... but is mold ever "sudden"? I've not read the policy but I have no doubt it addresses mold _specifically_ but seperately then water damage.

(again, property coverage = out of my area)

Posted: 03 May 2009 01:49 Post Subject: the thruth

I am in an insurance adjuster for 5 years now. Heres the truth about HO-3 forms. Claims are very delicate and what you say to the insurer could exclude you right out of any coverage. You need to know how to present the loss in a way that will fall within the coverage. It really falls down to words. New policies read that the "seepage or leak or condensation or vapor and blah blah" if continous for 14 or more days whether known or unknown to the insured are not covered. In other words, if u dont know about it, your screwed. A claim examiner for Citizens told me once, were not a maintenance policy the owner has to do check ups on his house like he does on his car. Im not sure if there is a JIffy Lube for homes where you can plug a house in and show you where the damage is.

Posted: 04 May 2009 11:08 Post Subject: water seepage insurance

what you say to the insurer could exclude you right out of any coverage. You need to know how to present the loss in a way that will fall within the coverage. It really falls down to words.

I've always referred to this as ''creative claims reporting", sounds better than lying.. :wink:

New policies read that the "seepage or leak or condensation or vapor and blah blah" if continuous for 14 or more days

claims maker, this is most likely a state or even company specific thing...my HO3 doesn't say anything about a time frame..

In other words, if u dont know about it, your screwed.

What happened to 'known or unknown' :?

were not a maintenance policy

Absolutely, have said this myself about a million times... :roll:

I'm not sure if there is a JIffy Lube for homes where you can plug a house in and show you where the damage is.

Never seen one, but a great idea...thing is...it does come down to maintenance...and all HO policies have the same 'main theme'...losses must be 'sudden and accidental'.

Posted: 05 May 2009 04:52 Post Subject: water leak insurance

Im not sure if there is a JIffy Lube for homes where you can plug a house in and show you where the damage is.



A house is the biggest (most expensive) thing that most people own, and it is surprising how often people don’t take care of their investment (if you can still call it that nowadays). It is good practice that at least once a week and after storms, a survey of your property should be made. Walk around the exterior of the house looking for damaged roofing or siding. Walk through the house looking for discoloration to walls or ceilings. I don’t think I have ever had a water loss claim that did not result in some sort of visible signs of water damage to ceilings, walls or floors. The only time I have had a claim where it was hidden is when someone had large furniture or stacks and stacks of boxes in a basement…. I even used to wheel my refrigerator out so I could look behind it (ice maker). There is usually some visible indicator that there is a problem. It only takes a couple 10 or 15 minutes to do and could save you a large loss that may not be covered.

Posted: 05 May 2009 05:12 Post Subject: water seepage insurance

Well, how can the insurer deny claim when the homeowner isn't aware of the damages? I agree that the homeowner must take proper care of his investment, but at times things may just happen. And, we buy coverage for that purpose, right?

Claim Maker, what would you suggest to the homeowners while filing for the claims?

Posted: 05 May 2009 10:48 Post Subject: water leak insurance

Well, how can the insurer deny claim when the homeowner isn't aware of the damages?

If the damage is NOT sudden and accident or if the damage IS gradual deterioration. These are not covered...if the damage is 'known' or should've been known..then you got a problem..perfect example is guy has a stool that just runs and runs...yeah, he's heard the water running for years, but never took the time to find out what the problem is, after all isn't hurting anything but his water bill right?... then one day he sees water on the ceiling below the john that's been running water forever...so a year later (after the water started running in the toliet) he turns in a claim...or storm blows singles off a roof, (or flashing/soffet, you pick)...instead of fixing it...the homeowner just leaves it alone, after all it didnt' hurt anything... then about a year or so later he see's his living room ceiling has a leak, goes into the attic, and it's been leaking for over a year...this is the type of thing we're talking about...if you hear water running in your house, and you have no faucetts on...you should get up off your duff, and find out why and fix it...it's generally pretty easy for an adjuster to tell if something is sudden and accidental, or has been going on for a long long time...homeowners policys are not meant to pay you to fix damage that you should've fixed when the problem started...all p&c policys require you to mitigate your damages as well...and you're not doing that by ignoring a problem that you know you have...

Posted: 12 Sep 2009 02:46 Post Subject:

We don't use our dining room often. Went in there today and discovered carpet was wet. Upon examiniation, discovered that there was leakage in the wall, black mold etc. Is this covered by insurance?

Posted: 13 Sep 2009 12:24 Post Subject:

It depends on what caused the water leak. It does sound like it's been going on for some time (mold). However, it doesn't cost anything to turn in a claim. I'd file on immediately.

Posted: 18 Sep 2009 06:32 Post Subject:

If a pipe bursts, you're probably covered. If you let a leaky faucet go unchecked for weeks, you're not.

Posted: 24 Sep 2009 12:04 Post Subject: We are probably in trouble

I googled "continuous leak" because that is what our adjuster just said about our situation. Our hot water heater was in the back of the crawlspace. It has seeped steam up into the crawlspace, ruining our floors. We did not know about it until the floors buckled. Then we had the roof checked, and the refrigerator checked. A small leak was found in the refrigerator and we paid to have it fixed. Then the floors seemed worse, so my husband checked the roof again. Finally, he thought about the hot water heater.

I feel like crying. Is it legal to burn your house down (after cancelling the insurance, of course) on your own farm? We will not be able to afford the repairs.

Posted: 24 Sep 2009 12:56 Post Subject:

I suppose if you got a burn permit it would be legal. I'm so very sorry...

Posted: 06 Oct 2009 05:11 Post Subject: Policy Coverage

Be careful in filing a water or leak claim that might or might not be paid. The insurance company will record the claim as "Close Without Payment or CWP". The claim report will be kept on file or recorded with CLUE INSURANCE DATA BASE.

A MUST READ BY HOMEOWNERS AND AUTOMOBILE OWNERS.

Posted: 19 Oct 2009 12:28 Post Subject: water leak by toilet valve

Will insurance cover for water leak by toilet valve and damage the ceiling under the toilet room?

thanks,

Posted: 11 Nov 2009 05:36 Post Subject: leaks in homes vs. fire?

Do you have the increased chances one has to have a water leak in their home versus having a fire? I would guess there are 50 or more water leak damaged homes (from plumbing, not hurricane damage etc.) for every fire in a home??? If you can e-mail the answer to this question, I would really appreciate it. (link removed by moderator)

Posted: 12 Nov 2009 05:07 Post Subject: Leaking pipe

Would a leaking pipe in a wall with no visable signs of water damage until now be covered or is that still negligiance?
Problem is in my bathroom behind the wall mirror and vanity there is a pipe I'm thinking conected to the water heater which is behind the wall has been leaking for awhile I just found a bubble on the wall and when I pushed on the wall it caved in and behind it there is lots of black mold and is very damp. Last year we had our heater replaced and I think they may have bumped the hot water heater and that may be when it started not sure. Question would this be covered under the homeowners ins?

Posted: 14 Nov 2009 01:22 Post Subject:

Question would this be covered under the homeowners ins?

This will be "iffy" but most certainly turn it in...(quickly)

Posted: 25 Nov 2009 05:21 Post Subject: Leaking pipe in a condo - not my pipe.

Now here's a bit of a twist to the leaking pipe claims. I own a ground floor condominium with two units above me. Sunday, I noticed damp carpet in the bathroom. Felt around for a bit until I felt spongy drywall (no visible signs of moisture). Called in a plumbing crew, they opened up the wall and discovered a cracked sewage pipe. The sewage pipe belongs to the two units above me. The "t-junction" just happens to be in my ceiling, and the remainder of the pipe runs down inside my wall. Who knows how long it has been going for, but there is some mold down on the floor of the inside of the wall where the water has obviously pooled.

Sure, maintenance issue is what I'm sure the adjuster is going to claim, but it's not my pipe. When I purchased the unit, I replaced my toilet and inspected all of my sinks and shower drains. My maintenance is up to par.

I've got a "drywall-in" condo owner policy on top of the policy the HOA holds. Who should file the claim, and what's going to happen?

Posted: 25 Nov 2009 11:30 Post Subject:

cracked sewage pipe---The sewage pipe belongs to the two units above me.

EWWWWWWW ! :shock:

If you have 'drywall in' I would think this baby would be on the association.

Posted: 25 Nov 2009 03:57 Post Subject:

Well, I covered the cost to repair the pipe - $245.00, but the HOA is willing to reimburse that cost back to me. The big problem however, is that I now have water damage from the "slow" leak - including a mold problem and actual sewage water seepage under my flooring and into the drywall.

I have HO-6 insurance, but I do know that insurance companies will deny claims for "slow leaks". Considering that this wasn't my pipe, but the damage did occur in my unit, where's the liability lie?

Thanks for the help.

Posted: 25 Nov 2009 10:27 Post Subject:

I would still turn this in...true, losses must be 'sudden and accidental' however, you DID act as soon as there was evidence of a problem...I see no way you 'could've' or 'should've' known about this..I think you'll have coverage.

Posted: 26 Nov 2009 04:31 Post Subject:

The adjuster came out and inspected the damage and immediately told me to have work started. He instructed me to have a contractor that I had bid the work earlier today get in contact with him ASAP. He also told me just to get the contractor on schedule to begin work. Can an adjuster go back on this statement? Nothing was signed, nothing was even written down - what formalities does the adjuster have to abide by now that he has given my clear instructions to begin work?

Posted: 26 Nov 2009 01:50 Post Subject:

Can an adjuster go back on this statement?

Could he? I suppose he could..will he? no...If you're worried, send him an e-mail...going over your conversation, and ask him to acknowledge it by return email that you understood him right, that it's ok to begin work, and your policy will cover it...i thought you'd have no trouble with this claim...this is different than your 'run of the mill' seepage--or slow leak..

Posted: 25 Dec 2009 09:58 Post Subject: roof/new owners

realtor says my roof claim would prevent my home from being insured by the new owners ... until a 5 yr. time spand passed..
is this correct?

Posted: 27 Dec 2009 12:42 Post Subject:

Why would a five year time period come into play? Are you sure they didn't say until the roof was replaced?

Posted: 28 Dec 2009 05:51 Post Subject:

realtor says my roof claim would prevent my home from being insured by the new owners ... until a 5 yr. time spand passed..
is this correct?



My realtor told me that there would be no problem getting a homeowners policy for a house my wife and I were buying but was going to be occupied by tenants (existing tenants) for the first couple weeks we owned the home. When I called him on it, he just look at me with a dumb face.

Posted: 28 Dec 2009 12:13 Post Subject:

My realtor told me that there would be no problem getting a homeowners policy for a house my wife and I were buying but was going to be occupied by tenants

:roll: apparently 'these' realtor's should stick to what they know..and what they know is NOT (clearly) insurance. :roll:

Posted: 17 Jan 2010 12:08 Post Subject: CITIZENS INSURANCE EXCLUSION

I have a renter's policy DP-3 with Citizens in Florida. The tenant failed to notice or ignored water leaking from an A/C condensate drain pan which damaged the structure. There was significant damage to an unused room however the damage was noticeable outside of the closed room. My claim was denied by Citizens invoking a new exclusion: :WE DO NOT INSURE FOR DAMAGES CAUSED BY CONSTANT OR REPEATED SEEPAGE OR LEAKAGE OF WATER OR STEAM, OR THE PRESENCE OR CONDENSATION OF HUMIDITY, MOISTURE OR VAPOR; WHICH OCCURS OVER A PERIOD OF 14 DAYS OR MORE, WHETHER HIDDEN OR NOT.

They are trying to say since the damage is "more than 14 days old (it probably occurred during the summer of 2009 when A/C was in use) that it is not covered. I see a difference in 14 days old and continued for 14 days.

Since no one can prove the damage occurred over a period of 14 days or more (the insured was certainly not aware of it until notified by the tenant) how can they deny the claim without proving the damage occurred over a period of 14 days or more. It is possible the damage occurred in 2 days, or 5 days, or even 10 days.

There are exclusions and limitations regarding a dwelling vacant for 30 days, but this new exlusion would require a policyholder to inspect a rental property at least every two weeks. Knowledge of leakage by the tenant cannot be imputed to the policyholder.

Opinion please?

Posted: 17 Jan 2010 12:51 Post Subject:

:WE DO NOT INSURE FOR DAMAGES CAUSED BY CONSTANT OR REPEATED SEEPAGE OR LEAKAGE OF WATER OR STEAM, OR THE PRESENCE OR CONDENSATION OF HUMIDITY, MOISTURE OR VAPOR; WHICH OCCURS OVER A PERIOD OF 14 DAYS OR MORE, WHETHER HIDDEN OR NOT.

This 'type' of exclusion isn't anything new...on any policys I've ever seen anyway...most I've read don't have a number of days however.

I certainly see your point...but the truth of the matter is that you would have to be able to prove it did not occur over a fourteen day period.

What is their response when you ask them how they can prove that this leak went on for fourteen days or more?

Posted: 18 Jan 2010 05:04 Post Subject:

I'm guessing here, but I assume that they are looking at the extent of damage compared to what caused the damage. A leaking A/C would normally have to leak for some time to cause

significant damage

.

These types of things happen all of the time, which is why most landlords are either selling properties cause they don't want the problems or they are putting wording in the lease that make the tenants responsible to report damage to the property promptly.

Posted: 04 Feb 2010 02:16 Post Subject: Epoxy Coating Water Pipes

I myself know how bad water damage can be, i see it everyday. Pinhole leaks and slab leaks are frequent but arbutrary. They will keep happening but im here to let you know there are solutions for these problems, permanent, without destorying your home. What im not understanding is why the insurane companies dont give homeowners an option to coat there pipes rather than spot repair the particular spot. Its better for the homeowner as well as the insurance company. Whats your feed back on this.

Posted: 04 Feb 2010 02:33 Post Subject:

I have a renter's policy DP-3 with Citizens in Florida

You have a dwelling (fire) policy. The person renting _from_ you has a renters policy. A dwelling/fire policy covers just the dwelling itself and not personal property inside.

but this new exlusion would require a policyholder to inspect a rental property at least every two weeks.

More or loss... or you could have good tenants who report these types of problems. But this is exactly the point... insurance companies don't want the liability of extensive damages just because someone did not correct the situation when it happens. They also don't want the liability of the renter being the one who is responsible for maintaining the property... as renters are simply not reliable or responsible for the dwelling. Feel free to collect a large deposit for this reason.

Also, check your policy to see if there is an exception to this exclusion but I'm doubting there is. You may also want to contact an independent agent and see if a carrier offers a DP3 that perhaps offers a less liberal exclusion.

Posted: 13 Feb 2010 01:00 Post Subject: claim timeline

I had an extensive waterpipe burst damage to my home a few weeks ago. I have filed the claim, but am wondering what each of the next steps are and how long does it typicaly take for each step.

Posted: 13 Feb 2010 05:30 Post Subject:

Hey NoHouse

After you file a claim, your insurance company may let you know of the procedure in which they handle such claims. They may also tell you about any responsibility that you have after the damage. You have to take care to stop any further damage to your property and arrange to get the damage repaired. You may select a plumber or contractor of your choice or get a list from the insurance company itself.

If you have replacement cost coverage, your insurance company will pay you to re-build the house up to the limits on your policy.

Posted: 19 Feb 2010 06:00 Post Subject: home insurance water leake cover

Does home insurance cover the water leakage under slab?

Posted: 19 Feb 2010 06:03 Post Subject:

No... that is a broken pipe and they are _usually_ not covered as it's wear. Resulting damage yes... but there is usually none.

Posted: 12 Mar 2010 01:07 Post Subject: 14 day seepage exclusion

So what the carrier is saying is that the PH must inspect the home every two weeks even when they are absent or on vacation. I believe that to be an undue burden on a home owner, a rental home owner or any homeowner who takes a vacation longer than 14 days.
What are the courts saying about this in FL?

Posted: 14 Mar 2010 03:13 Post Subject: water seepage where basement floor and wall meet

We just found water on our basement floor. We've never had this problem before. We had a blizzard in February with 33 inches of snow. This weekend it is heavy rain. Will my home owners insurance cover the repair and waterproofing?

Posted: 14 Mar 2010 01:01 Post Subject: Water damage help please

I had noticed water damage at all my windows after a big storm. So I called my insurance in November. The adjuster came out he said they have a restoration service they use and ask if I would like him to come out. I said yes. First the adjuster arrived and look at all the interior damage and then left. Then the restoration service came out and said there is little to no damage, said it was caused by humidity. I knew better then that so instantly called my builder. He came over tore the siding off and we observed the tape around the window was not torn so the water was leaking any where there was two windows side by side. He the left and sent me a quote two weeks later for 18,000 for repairs. I also had two other builders out with close estimates. Meanwhile the adjuster sent me a check for 1500. I called him and said there was much more damage then that. He said he knew and not to worry about it he would take care of it. I sent him the quote and he did not respond for a month. I called my agent complaining and then a few days later he called my saying he could not pay for anything on the quote. I showed up to his office asking him to explain and show me where it says that he could not pay in my policy. I told him mold was starting to develop I have a 2 kids a 4 month old and a father that does in home dialysis. He said he would come back out so I waited another week and he came out with another restoration service the professional now said the windows are bad and the adjuster said he would pay for the damage caused by the windows but not the windows as they were what caused the damage so I agreed to pay for the windows. So then called the adjuster and he was going to send out the project manager for that restoration service to make sure that was the problem. A few weeks later the guy came out tore the siding off and reveled the same thing my builder found old and faulty window tape that recently let go. This claim was filed on November 5 here it is March 14 and no resolution. The damage has gotten worse since the initial claim date. Also the house was built in 2004 and never had this problem prior. thanks to anyone that can advise.

Posted: 14 Mar 2010 01:20 Post Subject:

Will my home owners insurance cover the repair and waterproofing?

Certainly immediately call them and turn in the claim..but the thing about water claims, is this..it's wholely dependent upon the where the water came from and how...most (all I've seen) HO policys say a loss must be 'sudden and accidental' and NOT 'gradual deterioration', or some such wording..so clearly a pipe bursts, floods the house, that's easy..it's covered...however lets say you've got foundation cracks, and ground water comes in...not so much..

This claim was filed on November 5 here it is March 14 and no resolution. The damage has gotten worse since the initial claim date. Also the house was built in 2004 and never had this problem prior. thanks to anyone that can advise.

If I were you'd I'd be on the phone tomorrow filing a complaint with the dept of insurance of your state...immediately! :x

Posted: 19 Mar 2010 01:55 Post Subject: Water Damage

I do not have flood insurance and I liv in Florida. If a hurricane comes through and tears my roof off and it rains in my house will this be covered under my regular house insurance policy? I am afraid that it won't. Should I purchase flood insurance?

Posted: 23 Mar 2010 02:01 Post Subject: water leak

In Ga., we had an insurance thru our water company, that would protect us, if we had a leak in the pipes on the outside, can you tell me how we might get in touch with something like that in Tn. They just added the cost to our water bill there. Thanks

Posted: 09 Apr 2010 08:14 Post Subject: unusual event

We have a drywell for our pump that pumps up the water to our house. During the last rain storms in the New england area the water seeped in somehow into the drywell and ruined the pump and the well. We were forced to have an new water installed in a different area. We applied for the insurance company to at least cover the cost of a replacement pump and connection which they refused to do. This couldn't have been caused by flooding because we didn't get any water anywhere else in or around the house. We have lived here 40 years and have never had a water problem. We have seepage and mold coverage we have everything including earthquake coverage. I asked for a review of the claim saying I don't believe this to be ground water but they refused. What are my options?

Posted: 09 Apr 2010 09:07 Post Subject:

What are my options?

File a complaint with your states dept of insurance.

Posted: 13 Apr 2010 02:25 Post Subject:

I have a roof that need to be repaired, our last major rain storm we a four leaks one of our rooms, I am in the process of repairing the roof but am concerned with the sheetrock that I'm sure is growing mold, will be insurance cover the reapir of the inside damage ?

Posted: 13 Apr 2010 10:34 Post Subject:

Jim only if the damage to the roof was covered..

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